Home Page

Computing

Intent

 

Technology is becoming an everyday part of life. At St Leonard's we hope to prepare our children for a future in an environment which is shaped by technology. Our main priority of computing is to engage children with               cross-curricular learning through interacting with a variety of technology. We see technology as enriching learning opportunities. Therefore, we endeavour to provide computing opportunities throughout each area of the curriculum to provide a stimulus for learning.

We aim to develop confident, independent learners who are able to plan, design, create, program and evaluate information through the use of computing. As well as the benefits of computing, we are also aware of the risks. This is why we prepare our children to stay safe online through the use of e-safety awareness sessions and safer internet days. 

 

Implementation

 

Early Years

 

Children will be exposed to the understanding of internet safety as they explore the world around them and how technology is an everyday part of their learning and understanding of the world.

 

Key Stage 1

A high-quality computing education equips pupils to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world. Computing has deep links with mathematics, science, and design and technology, and provides insights into both natural and artificial systems. The core of computing is computer science, in which pupils are taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work, and how to put this knowledge to use through programming. Building on this knowledge and understanding, pupils are equipped to use information technology to create programs, systems and a range of content. Computing also ensures that pupils become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.

 

Key Stage 2 (Lower) 

Children will design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts.  They will use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs, use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and correct errors in algorithms and programs. Children will be taught to understand computer networks, including the internet, and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration. They will use search technologies effectively, learn to appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning in evaluating digital content. Children will be taught to select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals. They will use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact.

 

Impact

 

By the end of the Foundation Stage most children will be able to:

  • recognise that a range of technology is used in places such as homes and schools.  
  • select and use technology for particular purposes.

 

By the end of KS1 most children will be able to:

  • understand what an algorithm is
  • create and debug simple programs
  • use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs
  • use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content
  • recognise common uses of information technology beyond school
  • use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private and know where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content

 

By the end of Year 4 most children will be able to:

  • design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts
  • use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output
  • use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs
  • understand computer networks including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the world wide web; and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration
  • use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning in evaluating digital content
  • select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information
  • use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact.
Progression in Computing

 

 

Understanding Technology

 

Programming

Digital Literacy

E-Safety

Year 1

Pupils recognise and can give examples of common uses of information technology they encounter in their daily routine.

Pupils create, debug and implement instruction (simple algorithms) as programs on a range of digital devices.

Pupils understand that digital devices follow precise and unambiguous instructions.

Pupils understand that digital devices simulate real situations.

Pupils increasingly use a range of technology to enquire with purpose, accessing and creating digital content such as still and moving images, video, audio and text.

With appropriate levels of support, pupils collect data (e.g. numerical, research facts etc.) which they are able to retrieve, store and manipulate.

Pupils understand that information about themselves may be personal and they can choose who to share it with.

With support, pupils can manage can their online activity safely, recognising which information should be kept private. They can explain what it means to stay safe online and older pupils identify some of the potential risks associated with the online world.

Year 2

Pupils recognise common uses of information technology beyond school, including those which they don’t frequently encounter in their daily routine.

Pupils understand that algorithms are implemented as programs on digital devices.

Pupils create and debug programs to achieve specific goals.

Pupils use the principles of logical reasoning to plan and predict the behaviour of simple programs.

Pupils solve real and imaginary problems on and off screen.

They can present and communicate their learning to others in a variety of ways.

With support, pupils are beginning to access and retrieve online content, making appropriate choices to achieve specific goals.

They communicate safely and respectfully using a range of digital devices, making links to their behaviour in the physical world.

Pupils start to develop strategies for managing concerns about online content or contact; seeking help and support when needed.

Year 3

Pupils develop an understanding of how computers can be linked to form local networks.

Pupils recognise and describe some of the services offered by the Internet, especially those used for communication and collaboration.

Pupils create programs to accomplish specific goals:

- using an increasing range of digital devices and applications.

- exploring and understanding the impact of changing instructions.

- using sequence and repetition

- decomposing problems both on and off screen

- using the principles of logical reasoning in order to resolve problems.

Pupils are confident and creative users of technology. They are beginning to make informed choices about the appropriateness of digital content they access and create, using an increasing range of digital resources and devices

Pupils identify, collect and manipulate different types of data (e.g. numerical data from science experiments, words, still and moving images etc.) which they present as information, showing a greater awareness of purpose and audience.

Continued in Y4

Pupils, review their online activity, including maintaining amending online profiles, communication channels and publishing spaces to ensure they do not inadvertently reveal personal details.

Pupils show respect for content created by others by acknowledging sources, commenting respectfully and responsibly on other people’s work and respecting privacy. They are discriminating about what they share and whether any permission is needed to do so.  Continued in Y4

Year 4

Pupils develop an understanding of how computers can be linked to form local networks.

Pupils recognise and describe some of the services offered by the Internet, especially those used for communication and collaboration.

Pupils create and debug programs.

They can:

- use sequence and repetition.

- refine algorithms to improve efficiency

- control or simulate physical systems

 

Pupils begin to explore and notice the similarities and differences between programming languages and use this knowledge to help them create and debug programs efficiently.

Continued from Y3 

Pupils become more discerning in their choice of search technology to accomplish specific goals. They understand the need for efficiency when conducting searches, choosing keywords carefully.

Continued from Y3:

Pupils can identify a range of potential online risks including inappropriate contact or content and can identify ways of seeking support and reporting concerns. They exercise caution when receiving attachments and following web links contained in messages.